A lot of people, websites and communities encourage you to run your Tor node – middle node or bridge, not exit node, but none of them tell you about real consequences of keeping a Tor node active for a long time. So, here I’m going to share with you my experience of running middle node on VPS/dedicated server and home router. This post is divided into parts, one shortly describes problems when running Tor on your home IP, and the second section is about running it on your server. It describes my experience, so not all of it applies to you.

This post is meant as a warning for you, because a lot of portals and people will tell you to help Tor by hosting a node, as it doesn’t cost anything… but they don’t tell you what are the costs not in terms of money.
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I like to automate some boring and easy tasks we all have to do often, so I would like to share with you an easy but not too widely known trick in Debian/Ubuntu for automated upgrades, that can be performed without any manual actions.

This post describes the following configurations for a server:

  1. Installation and configuration of unattended upgrades on Debian
  2. Setup of Tor service that will be used for Debian upgrades
  3. Removal of unused dependencies

Unattended upgrades are well described on Debian wiki, but to keep those steps in one place, I’ll copy some parts of it here.

First, you have to install the following packages:

apt-get install unattended-upgrades apt-listchanges

Installation process should create new file /etc/apt/apt.conf.d/50unattended-upgrades where we configure how automated upgrades work and what can be upgraded.

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