Consequences of running Tor node on your server or home computer

A lot of people, websites and communities encourage you to run your Tor node – middle node or bridge, not exit node, but none of them tell you about real consequences of keeping a Tor node active for a long time. So, here I’m going to share with you my experience of running middle node on VPS/dedicated server and home router. This post is divided into parts, one shortly describes problems when running Tor on your home IP, and the second section is about running it on your server. It describes my experience, so not all of it applies to you.

This post is meant as a warning for you, because a lot of portals and people will tell you to help Tor by hosting a node, as it doesn’t cost anything… but they don’t tell you what are the costs not in terms of money.
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Omnia Turris – random rainbow colours

Script for Omnia Turris making your router light with random colour every second.

 

 

 

#!/bin/bash
 
colors=('red' 'blue' 'green' 'white');
leds=('lan0' 'lan1' 'lan2' 'lan3' 'lan4' 'pwr' 'wan' 'pci1' 'pci2' 'pci3' 'usr1' 'usr2');
 
while true; do
    for led in "${leds[@]}"
    do
        rand_color=$[$RANDOM % 5]
        rainbow ${led} ${colors[rand_color]}
    done
    sleep 1;
done

To get this quickly working:

  1. login on your Turris router
  2. wget https://gitlab.com/snippets/34184/raw -O random_rainbow.sh
  3. bash random_rainbow.sh &
  4. you can logout now, script will be working in background

Test coverage on GitLab CI in a rust-cargo project

This topic presents who to setup kcov with cargo to get a test coverage for a cargo project, so I just assume you got kcov working in your Linux distribution and you have a project with source code and tests that you can run. I also assume you have gitlab-ci-multi-runner installed. So I will just quickly present who to configure it to use with GitLab CI to get test coverage badge in your new project.

I use my own CI runner, I’m not using shared runners or docker for it. So it’s pretty straightforward, your configuration will differ a bit.

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Automated delivery and publication of apps using FDroid and GitLabCI

In my spare time I develop applications on Android. I also “maintain” F-Droid repository for some of my public projects. I wanted to automatically publish each build after:

  1. Compilation passed
  2. Test on a connected device passed
  3. Signed build completed

So I made a simple setup with help of GitLabCI and own F-Droid repository. This post does not describe how to configure F-Droid repository or configuration of GItLabCI-runner, because official documentation is much better than I could write it. This post just describes how I use both services to automate boring deployment.

GtiLabCI is run on your own hardware, so it can have access to your files, configuration etc. It’s an advantage over Travis, as you can run any custom command, like testing on connected device or on pre-configured emulator, connected to remote hosts where CI slave is on a trusted machine.

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Rust – get user’s home directory

fn main() {
  let mut path: PathBuf = get_app_dir();
  path.push(".config");
  path.set_file_name("properties");
  path.set_extension("ini");
  let str_path = path.to_str().unwrap();
  if str_path.len() != 0 && path_exists(&path) {
    println!("Path {} exists", str_path);
  }
}
 
fn get_app_dir() -> PathBuf {
    let dir: PathBuf = match env::home_dir() {
        Some(path) => PathBuf::from(path),
        None => PathBuf::from(""),
    };
    dir
}
 
pub fn path_exists(path: &PathBuf) -> bool {
    return Path::new(&path).exists();
}